Last edited by Meran
Monday, July 13, 2020 | History

2 edition of Dasheen, a root crop for the South found in the catalog.

Dasheen, a root crop for the South

Young, Robert A.

Dasheen, a root crop for the South

by Young, Robert A.

  • 83 Want to read
  • 36 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Bureau of Plant Industry, Office of Foreign seed and Plant Introduction in Washington .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Taro

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Robert A. Young
    ContributionsUnited States. Office of Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction
    The Physical Object
    Pagination11 p. :
    Number of Pages11
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15488951M

    Taro [Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott] is a tropical root crop grown primarily for its starchy corm or underground stem. It is one of the most important staple food crops in the Pacific Islands and is widely grown throughout the South Pacific, Asia, and Africa (Kreike et al., ). Traditionally, taro is propagated vegetatively through suckers. But saffron commands a fairly high price tag, making this a particularly profitable crop. Cherry Tomatoes. Cherry tomatoes are small and can easily grow in a backyard or small garden. You can pick the tomatoes constantly throughout the season. So it’s a perfect option for growers who want a steady yield of crops.

      Root crops should be planted when the moon is in an Earth sign. Carrots, turnips, swedes, beetroots, potatoes etc will benefit from being planted when the moon is in Taurus, Virgo or Capricorn. Finally, when the moon is in Cancer, Scorpio or . Among the tropical root and tuber crops, cassava, commonly known by the name tapioca, native to South America belonging to the family Euphorbiaceae occupies the first position in terms of area and.

      Taro (Colocasia esculenta) a tropical tuber crop, belonging to the family of Araceae, is of great economic importance because of its use as a staple food, highly nutritious and good economic is grown primarily as a vegetable food for its edible corms which are very high in starch dietary fibers, and secondarily as leaf vegetables.   For a non-stop supply of taro, a second crop can be planted between the rows about 12 weeks before the first crop is harvested. Harvesting Taro Roots. Within the first week, you should notice a small green stem poking up through the soil. Soon, the plant will become a thick bush that may grow a foot to up to 6 feet ( m.), depending upon the.


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Dasheen, a root crop for the South by Young, Robert A. Download PDF EPUB FB2

About this Book Catalog Record Details. The dasheen: a tropical root crop for the South / v(). Hodge, W. (Walter Henricks), View full.

South since In the spring of that year the sending out of seed Reference the current page of this Book. Young, Robert A. (Robert Armstrong), b. The Dasheen: A Southern Root Crop for Home Use and Market., book, December ; Washington by: 3.

Cover title "Contains much material formerly in Farmers' bulletinthe dasheen: a southern root crop for home use and market." Bibliography: p. 28Pages: Get this from a library. a root crop for the South book The dasheen: a southern root crop for home use and market.

[Robert A Young; United States. Department of Agriculture.]. Taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott), also known as eddoe or dasheen, originated in the Bay of Bengal region of South-east Asia. It was carried by early Polynesians Dasheen Oceania, where it became a staple food. It is an ancient crop in Asia, being introduced into Japan more than years ago.

NOTE: If you are seeking the Best Days to plant a particular vegetable or fruit, please see our Planting Calendar, which lists suggested planting dates based on the Moon and on local frost dates. For plant-specific gardening advice, check out our free library of Growing Guides for vegetables, herbs, fruit, flowers, houseplants, and more.

In the s, dasheen, as it was known, was highly touted by the Secretary of the Florida Department of Agriculture as a valuable crop for growth in muck fields. Fellsmere, Florida, near the east coast, was a farming area deemed perfect for growing dasheen. It was used in place of.

The Dasheen has a two-fold purpose, one as ground provision and the other as Callaloo bush. When planting dasheen make sure that the area is wet, as dasheen grows best in wet conditions. Plant your dasheen in an area where the soil is damp and it will thrive, if not ensure to water the dasheen stool regularly to keep its soil as moist as possible.

texts All Books All Texts latest This Just In Smithsonian Libraries FEDLINK (US) Genealogy Lincoln Collection. National Emergency Library. Top American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library.

Open Library. The crops covered include bananas and plantains (Musa sp.), cassava (Manihot esculenta), sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas), cocoyam (taro - Colocasia and Xanthosoma), and yam (Dioscorea sp.).

The book is intended for nutritionists, agriculturists, dieticians, community development workers, school teachers and economists.

Slave traders exported taro to the New World where it became an important crop in the West Indies, Central and South America and the southern United States. The word eddo is derived from the West African word for taro and dasheen is a Creole name adapted from the French de Chine—which (erroneously for taro) means from China.

Cassava roots are much more perishable than other major root and tuber crops. This has been attributed to the fact that the root of cassava, the storage organ, has no dormancy, has no function in propagation and possesses no bud primordia from which regrowth can occur (OnwuemeCooke et al.

a, Wickam ). Eddoe or eddo is a tropical vegetable often considered identifiable as the species Colocasia antiquorum, closely related to taro (dasheen, Colocasia esculenta), which is primarily used for its thickened stems ().

It has smaller corms than taro, and in most cultivars there is an acrid taste that requires careful cooking. The young leaves can also be cooked and eaten, but (unlike taro) they have. A second crop of taro can be planted between taro rows about 12 weeks before the main crop is harvested.

Container growing. Taro can be grown in a container in a greenhouse or warm cellar to force shoots or stems for winter use. Force tubers in a warm bed of sand. Taro is the pre-eminent root crop in Cook Islands. Firstly, it occupies a larger area of land that any other root crop, as can be seen from Table 7.

The islands with the largest taro area in were Rarotonga (ha), Mangaia (29ha), Mauke (9ha), Nassau (9ha) and Aitutaki (9ha). The total area occupied by taro in was ha. Excerpt from Promising Root Crops for the South: I. Yautias, Taros, and Dasheens; II. Agricultural History and Utility of the Cultivated Aroids For many years the lack of a wet-land root crop has been felt throughout the South Atlantic and Gulf States.

In view of the fact that some acres in the Carolinas and Georgia have been fully abandoned Author: O. Barrett. The gravitation pull is high, creating more moisture in the soil, but the moonlight is decreasing, putting energy into the roots.

This is a favorable time for planting root time for crops, such as beets and carrots. It is also good for perennials, bulbs and transplanting because of the active root.

This book addresses the role of roots in crop production and includes references to numerous annual crops. In addition, it brings together the issues and the state-of-the-art technologies that affect root growth, with comprehensive reviews to facilitate efficient, sustainable, economical, and environmentally responsible crop production.

Promising Root Crops For The South: Yautias, Taros, And Dasheens [Barrett, Otis Warren, Orator Fuller Cook] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Promising Root Crops For The South: Yautias, Taros, And Dasheens Author: Otis Warren Barrett. Taro: The word taro—as well as dasheen, malanga, and other names—is applied to quite a number of starchy tropical tubers, all which are high-carbohydrate foods that are staples in the Pacific islands, Asia, the Caribbean, Africa, and parts of South America.

Taro root’s most familiar use is in poi, a sticky taro paste eaten in Hawaii. annual root crops can be planted in the annual garden bed or allotment, depending on size root crops form one of the components of a crop rotation system with leaf, fruiting and leguminous crops in the southern hemisphere, locate the annual vegetable garden on the northern (sunward) side so as to maximise exposure to sunlight.

Initially, the group used indigenous varieties but the yield was low and the crop was prone to pests and diseases. They turned to the larger Dasheen variety from Uganda. Also read.Taro is grown as a root crop throughout the humid tropics and is one of the most important food staples in the Pacific.

It needs a long, frost-free growing season and plenty of water. Taro has large, light green, heart-shaped leaves, fleshy stems and grows up to m in height.